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GIFTED AND TALENTED PROCEDURES

Mercer County Technical Schools adheres to the following New Jersey Administrative code as applied to our Gifted and Talented learners:

Statutes and Regulations

N.J.A.C. 6A:8-1.3

“Gifted and talented students” means students who possess or demonstrate high levels of ability in one or more content areas when compared to their chronological peers in the local school district and who require modifications of their educational program if they are to achieve in accordance with their capabilities.

“Instructional adaptation” means an adjustment or modification to instruction enabling students with disabilities, ELLs, or students in alternative education programs or who are gifted and talented to participate in, benefit from, and/or demonstrate knowledge and application of the NJSLS.

6A:8-3.1(a) Curriculum and instruction

District boards of education shall ensure that curriculum and instruction are designed and delivered in such a way that all students are able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills specified by the NJSLS and shall ensure that appropriate instructional adaptations are designed and delivered for students with disabilities, for ELLs, for students enrolled in alternative education programs, and for students who are gifted and talented.

6A:8-3.1(a)(5)

District boards of education shall be responsible for identifying gifted and talented students and shall provide them with appropriate instructional adaptations and services.

  1. District boards of education shall make provisions for an ongoing K-12
    identification process for gifted and talented students that includes
    multiple measures.
  2. District boards of education shall provide appropriate kindergarten through-grade-12 (K-12) educational services for gifted and talented students.
  3. District boards of education shall develop appropriate curricular and instructional modifications used for gifted and talented students indicating content, process, products, and learning environment.
  4. District boards of education shall take into consideration the Pre-K–Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards of the National Association for Gifted Children in developing programs for gifted and talented students.

6A:8-3.1(c)

District boards of education shall be responsible for the review and continuous improvement of curriculum and instruction based upon changes in knowledge, technology, assessment results, and modifications to the NJSLS, according to N.J.A.C. 6A:8-2.

  1. District boards of education shall include interdisciplinary connections throughout the K-12 curriculum.
  2. District boards of education shall integrate into the curriculum 21st century themes and skills.
  3. District boards of education shall provide the time and resources to develop, review, and enhance interdisciplinary connections, supportive curricula, and instructional tools for helping students acquire required knowledge and skills.
    The tools include, but are not limited to:
    1. A pacing guide;
    2. A list of core instructional materials, including various levels of texts at each grade level;
    3. Benchmark assessments; and
    4. Modifications for special education students, for ELLs in accordance with N.J.A.C. 6A:15, for students at risk of school failure, and for gifted students.

6A:13-2.1(a) Standards-based instruction

All school districts shall implement a coherent curriculum for all students, including English language learners (ELLs), gifted and talented students and students with disabilities, that is content-rich and aligned to the most recent revision of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards (NJSLS). The curriculum shall guide instruction to ensure that every student masters the NJSLS. Instruction shall be designed to engage all students and modified based on student performance. Such curriculum shall include:

  1. Interdisciplinary connections throughout;
  2. Integration of 21st century skills;
  3. A pacing guide;
  4. A list of instructional materials, including various levels of text at each grade;
  5. Benchmark assessments; and
  6. Modifications for special education students, for English language learners in accordance with N.J.A.C. 6A:15 and for gifted students.

Operational Procedures for Referral, Identification and Education of Gifted and Talented Learners

IDENTIFICATION

MCTS identification procedures include standardized test scores; achievement test scores; ability test scores; classroom performance; teacher and student recommendations and nominations; parent input; as well as other appropriate measures developed which apply to all populations, including under-represented groups and Special Education students.  All identification measures will be assessed on objective terms.  It is important to note that no one single measure will automatically include or exclude a student from our programming. Identification measures, test subsets, and classroom performance are used to most accurately measure a student’s domain-specific aptitudes.

Identification processes do begin in ninth grade and based on developmental readiness with programming provided through targeted enrichment of activities within the general education classroom.  All candidates and their needs will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. All grades in our District (9-12) receive some form of services, support, and guidance from the building administration based on the student’s developmental needs. Some program components available in our schools are designed to meet the needs of students with exceptional strengths in a specific area who may not meet the criteria for the general academic Gifted and Talented Programming.  We do not have one gifted program in our District, but rather a variety of programming and services that can be adapted to meet a student’s individual needs at a specific time.  Also, differentiated instruction and project-based learning allow for learners to be consistently challenged.

DUAL ENROLLMENT AND ADVANCED COURSES

Students may take college courses at Mercer County Community College, another college approved by the Building Principal, or advanced classes on the Acellus learning platform.  Students must follow the District’s Option 2 procedures at their building level and get prior approval from the Building Principal to qualify for dual enrollment and advanced courses. Additionally, students must adhere to the admissions procedures for pre-requisite courses at Mercer County Community College. 

SELECTION CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION TO GIFTED AND TALENTED PROGRAMMING

Students planning to pursue Gifted and Talented Programming are required to submit a completed application to the Principal’s Option II Review Committee. This committee will be comprised of the High School Principal, Supervisor and a designated School Counselor. The Principal’s Option II Review Committee will review each application to determine eligibility and grant approval/disapproval based on the criteria outlined. Each student’s application will be reviewed on its own merit. The committee will ensure that each student is on track to fulfill graduation requirements.

MCTS adheres to the following standards for Gifted and Talented:

Standards for Faculty in Gifted Education Teacher Preparation Programs

Faculty in teacher preparation programs in gifted and talented education assume responsibility for the development of Pre-K-12 teachers who are well-prepared in recognizing and responding to the needs of gifted, talented, and high-potential students.

Standard 1: Learning and Development 

Description: Educators, recognizing the learning and developmental differences of students with gifts and talents, promote ongoing self-understanding, awareness of their needs, and cognitive and affective growth of these students in school, home, and community settings to ensure specific student outcomes.

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

1.1. Self-Understanding. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate self-knowledge with respect to their interests, strengths, identities, and needs in socio-emotional development and in intellectual, academic, creative, leadership, and artistic domains.

1.1.1. Educators engage students with gifts and talents in identifying interests, strengths, and gifts. 

 

Practice: Use of Career Cruising and NJCAN for Career Planning

 

1.1.2. Educators assist students with gifts and talents in developing identities supportive of achievement. 

 

Practice: Participation in CTSO Competitions such as SKILLS USA, Prostart, FFA, and HOSA

1.2. Self-Understanding. Students with gifts and talents possess a developmentally appropriate understanding of how they learn and grow; they recognize the influences of their beliefs, traditions, and values on their learning and behavior.

1.2.1. Educators develop activities that match each student’s developmental level and culture-based learning needs. 

 

Practice: Curriculum Modifications and Accommodations

1.3. Self-Understanding. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate understanding of and respect for similarities and differences between themselves and their peer group and others in the general population.

1.3.1. Educators provide a variety of research-based grouping practices for students with gifts and talents that allow them to interact with individuals of various gifts, talents, abilities, and strengths. 

 

Practice: Problem and Project Based Learning Activities, Dual Credit Enrollment, and CTSO Competitions

 

1.3.2. Educators model respect for individuals with diverse abilities, strengths, and goals.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning, Practices for CTSO Competitions

1.4. Awareness of Needs. Students with gifts and talents access resources from the community to support cognitive and affective needs, including social interactions with others having similar interests and abilities or experiences, including same-age peers and mentors or experts. 

1.4.1. Educators provide role models (e.g., through mentors, bibliotherapy) for students with gifts and talents that match their abilities and interests. 

 

Practice: Guest Speakers, Trips, SLEs and CIE 

 

1.4.2. Educators identify out-of-school learning opportunities that match students’ abilities and interests. 

 

Practice: Guest Speakers, Trips, SLEs and CIE 

1.5. Awareness of Needs. Students’ families and communities understand similarities and differences with respect to the development and characteristics of advanced and typical learners and support students with gifts and talents’ needs.

1.5.1. Educators collaborate with families in accessing resources to develop their child’s talents.

 

Practice: Youtube Channel, Counseling Services by Guidance and CST, Career Planning Services by CIE Coordinator

1.6. Cognitive and Affective Growth. Students with gifts and talents benefit from meaningful and challenging learning activities addressing their unique characteristics and needs. 

1.6.1. Educators design interventions for students to develop cognitive and affective growth that is based on research of effective practices.

 

Practice: Guest Speakers, SLEs, CIE

 

1.6.2. Educators develop specialized intervention services for students with gifts and talents who are underachieving and are now learning and developing their talents. 

 

Practice: Counseling Services by Guidance and CST, Career Planning Services by CIE Coordinator

1.7. Cognitive and Affective Growth. Students with gifts and talents recognize their preferred approaches to learning and expand their repertoire.

1.7.1. Teachers enable students to identify their preferred approaches to learning, accommodate these preferences, and expand them. 

 

Practice: Interest Inventories, Career Cruising, NJ CAN Website

1.8. Cognitive and Affective Growth. Students with gifts and talents identify future career goals that match their talents and abilities and resources needed to meet those goals (e.g., higher education opportunities, mentors, financial support). 

1.8.1. Educators provide students with college and career guidance that is consistent with their strengths.

 

Practice: Transition Services, District Website, Guidance Counseling

 

1.8.2. Teachers and counselors implement a curriculum scope and sequence that contains person/social awareness and adjustment, academic planning, and vocational and career awareness. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning/Curriculum Delivery

Standard 2: Assessment 

Description: Assessments provide information about identification, learning progress and outcomes, and evaluation of programming for students with gifts and talents in all domains. 

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

2.1. Identification. All students in grades PK-12 have equal access to a comprehensive assessment system that allows them to demonstrate diverse characteristics and behaviors that are associated with giftedness.

2.1.1. Educators develop environments and instructional activities that encourage students to express diverse characteristics and behaviors that are associated with giftedness.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning/Curriculum Delivery

 

2.1.2. Educators provide parents/guardians with information regarding diverse characteristics and behaviors that are associated with giftedness.

 

Practice: District Website, Principals’

Corner, Facebook, Instagram

2.2. Identification. Each student reveals his or her exceptionalities or potential through assessment evidence so that appropriate instructional accommodations and modifications can be provided.

2.2.1. Educators establish comprehensive, cohesive, and ongoing procedures for identifying and serving students with gifts and talents. These provisions include informed consent, committee review, student retention, student reassessment, student exiting, and appeals procedures for both entry and exit from gifted program services.

 

Practice: Gifted and Talented Procedures

 

2.2.2. Educators select and use multiple assessments that measure diverse abilities, talents, and strengths that are based on current theories, models, and research.

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI; Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessment

 

2.2.3 Assessments provide qualitative and quantitative information from a variety of sources, including off-level testing, are non-biased and equitable, and are technically adequate for the purpose.

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI; Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessment

 

2.2.4. Educators have knowledge of student exceptionalities and collect assessment data while adjusting curriculum and instruction to learn about each student’s developmental level and aptitude for learning.

 

Practice: Use of Powerschool, District Data Coordinator Reporting

 

2.2.5. Educators interpret multiple assessments in different domains and understand the uses and limitations of the assessments in identifying the needs of students with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Use of Powerschool/Lesson Planning/PLCs

 

2.2.6. Educators inform all parents/guardians about the identification process. Teachers obtain parental/guardian permission for assessments, use culturally sensitive checklists, and elicit evidence regarding the child’s interests and potential outside of the classroom setting.

 

Practice: District Website/Lesson Planning/Career Cruising

2.3. Identification. Students with identified needs represent diverse backgrounds and reflect the total student population of the district. 

2.3.1. Educators select and use non-biased and equitable approaches for identifying students with gifts and talents, which may include using locally developed norms or assessment tools in the child’s native language or in nonverbal formats. 

 

Practice: Use of Google Translate/Lesson Planning/Recruitment Videos in Native Language

 

2.3.2. Educators understand and implement district and state policies designed to foster equity in gifted programming and services.

 

Practice: District Website/Use of Google Translate/Recruitment Videos in Native Language

 

2.3.3. Educators provide parents/guardians with information in their native language regarding diverse behaviors and characteristics that are associated with giftedness and with information that explains the nature and purpose of gifted programming options.

 

Practice: District Website/Use of Google Translate/Recruitment Videos in Native Language

2.4. Learning Progress and Outcomes. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate advanced and complex learning as a result of using multiple, appropriate, and ongoing assessments.

2.4.1. Educators use differentiated pre- and post- performance-based assessments to measure the progress of students with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI; Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessment

 

2.4.2. Educators use differentiated product-based assessments to measure the progress of students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI; Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessment

 

2.4.3. Educators use off-level standardized assessments to measure the progress of students with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI

 

2.4.4. Educators use and interpret qualitative and quantitative assessment information to develop a profile of the strengths and weaknesses of each student with gifts and talents to plan appropriate intervention.

 

Practice: Powerschool/Lesson Plans/Curriculum Goals and Objectives

 

2.4.5. Educators communicate and interpret assessment information to students with gifts and talents and their parents/guardians.

 

Practice: Use of Parent Portal Powerschool Gradebook

2.5. Evaluation of Programming. Students identified with gifts and talents demonstrate important learning progress as a result of programming and services. 

2.5.1. Educators ensure that the assessments used in the identification and evaluation processes are reliable and valid for each instrument’s purpose, allow for above-grade-level performance, and allow for diverse perspectives. 

 

Practice: Pre/Mid/Post-Testing; NOCTI

 

2.5.2. Educators ensure that the assessment of the progress of students with gifts and talents uses multiple indicators that measure mastery of content, higher level thinking skills, achievement in specific program areas, and affective growth. 

 

Practice: Curriculum/Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessments

 

2.5.3. Educators assess the quantity, quality, and appropriateness of the programming and services provided for students with gifts and talents by disaggregating assessment data and yearly progress data and making the results public.

 

Practice: Board Meeting Reports of Assessment Results

2.6. Evaluation of Programming. Students identified with gifts and talents have increased access and they show significant learning progress as a result of improving components of gifted education programming. 

2.6.1. Administrators provide the necessary time and resources to implement an annual evaluation plan developed by persons with expertise in program evaluation and gifted education. 

 

Practice: PLCs/Prep Time

 

2.6.2. The evaluation plan is purposeful and evaluates how student-level outcomes are influenced by one or more of the following components of gifted education programming: (a) identification, (b) curriculum, (c) instructional programming and services, (d) ongoing assessment of student learning, (e) counseling and guidance programs, (f) teacher qualifications and professional development, (g) parent/guardian and community involvement, (h) programming resources, and (i) programming design, management, and delivery.

 

Practice: G & T Procedures

 

2.6.3. Educators disseminate the results of the evaluation, orally and in written form, and explain how they will use the results.

 

Practice: District Website

Standard 3: Curriculum Planning and Instruction 

Description: Educators apply the theory and research-based models of curriculum and instruction related to students with gifts and talents and respond to their needs by planning, selecting, adapting, and creating culturally relevant curriculum and by using a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to ensure specific student outcomes. 

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

3.1. Curriculum Planning. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate growth commensurate with aptitude during the school year.

3.1.1. Educators use local, state, and national standards to align and expand curriculum and instructional plans.

 

Practice: Curriculum

 

3.1.2. Educators design and use a comprehensive and continuous scope and sequence to develop differentiated plans for PK-12 students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Guides4Learning/Lesson Planning

 

3.1.3. Educators adapt, modify, or replace the core or standard curriculum to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents and those with special needs such as twice-exceptional, highly gifted, and English language learners.

 

Practice: Curriculum Modifications and Accommodations

 

3.1.4. Educators design differentiated curricula that incorporate advanced, conceptually challenging, in-depth, distinctive, and complex content for students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Curriculum Modifications and Accommodations

 

3.1.5. Educators use a balanced assessment system, including pre-assessment and formative assessment, to identify students’ needs, develop differentiated education plans, and adjust plans based on continual progress monitoring. 

 

Practice: Use of Formative, Benchmark, Summative and Alternate Assessments

 

3.1.6. Educators use pre-assessments and pace instruction based on the learning rates of students with gifts and talents and accelerate and compact learning as appropriate. 

 

Practice: Pacing Guides/Lesson Plans

 

3.1.7. Educators use information and technologies, including assistive technologies, to individualize for students with gifts and talents, including those who are twice-exceptional. 

 

Practice: Use of Google Classroom/Lesson Plans

3.2. Talent Development. Students with gifts and talents become more competent in multiple talent areas and across dimensions of learning.

3.2.1. Educators design curricula in cognitive, affective, aesthetic, social, and leadership domains that are challenging and effective for students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Participation in CTSOs

 

3.2.2. Educators use metacognitive models to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice:  Lesson Plans

3.3. Talent Development. Students with gifts and talents develop their abilities in their domain of talent and/or area of interest. 

3.3.1. Educators select, adapt, and use a repertoire of instructional strategies and materials that differentiate for students with gifts and talents and that respond to diversity.

 

Practice: Curriculum/Lesson Plans

 

3.3.2. Educators use school and community resources that support differentiation. 

 

Practice: Student Placement in Work-Based Learning Setting

 

3.3.3. Educators provide opportunities for students with gifts and talents to explore, develop, or research their areas of interest and/or talent.

 

Practice: Participation in CTSOs

3.4. Instructional Strategies. Students with gifts and talents become independent investigators.

3.4.1. Educators use critical-thinking strategies to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

3.4.2. Educators use creative-thinking strategies to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

3.4.3. Educators use problem-solving model strategies to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

3.4.4. Educators use inquiry models to meet the needs of students with gifts and talents.  

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

3.5. Culturally Relevant Curriculum. Students with gifts and talents develop knowledge and skills for living and being productive in a multicultural, diverse, and global society.

3.5.1. Educators develop and use challenging, culturally responsive curriculum to engage all students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Curriculum/Lesson Planning

 

3.5.2. Educators integrate career exploration experiences into learning opportunities for students with gifts and talents, e.g. biography study or speakers.

 

Practice:  Curriculum/Lesson Planning

 

3.5.3. Educators use curriculum for deep explorations of cultures, languages, and social issues related to diversity. 

 

Practice: Integrated Curriculum Standards- Holocaust/Amistad/LGBT-Q

3.6. Resources. Students with gifts and talents benefit from gifted education programming that provides a variety of high quality resources and materials.

3.6.1. Teachers and administrators demonstrate familiarity with sources for high quality resources and materials that are appropriate for learners with gifts and talents. 

 

Practice: Use of Acellus/Access to College/Dual Credit Courses

Standard 4: Learning Environments 

Description: Learning environments foster personal and social responsibility, multicultural competence, and interpersonal and technical communication skills for leadership in the 21st century to ensure specific student outcomes. 

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

4.1. Personal Competence. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate growth in personal competence and dispositions for exceptional academic and creative productivity. These include self-awareness, self-advocacy, self-efficacy, confidence, motivation, resilience, independence, curiosity, and risk taking.

4.1.1. Educators maintain high expectations for all students with gifts and talents as evidenced in meaningful and challenging activities.

 

Practice: Lesson Plans

 

4.1.2. Educators provide opportunities for self-exploration, development and pursuit of interests, and development of identities supportive of achievement, e.g., through mentors and role models.

 

Practice: CIE Placement, Job Shadowing, Guest Speakers

 

4.1.3. Educators create environments that support trust among diverse learners.

 

Practice: Teacher Professional Development/Trauma Based Learning Training

 

4.1.4. Educators provide feedback that focuses on effort, on evidence of potential to meet high standards, and on mistakes as learning opportunities.

 

Practice: Classroom Instruction/Teacher Modeling

 

4.1.5. Educators provide examples of positive coping skills and opportunities to apply them.

 

Practice: Classroom Instruction/Teacher Modeling

4.2. Social Competence. Students with gifts and talents develop social competence manifested in positive peer relationships and social interactions.

4.2.1. Educators understand the needs of students with gifts and talents for both solitude and social interaction. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

4.2.2. Educators provide opportunities for interaction with intellectual and artistic/creative peers as well as with chronological-age peers.

 

Practice: Access to College Courses

 

4.2.3. Educators assess and provide instruction on social skills needed for school, community, and the world of work. 

 

Practice: CIE Placements

4.3. Leadership. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate personal and social responsibility and leadership skills.

4.3.1 Educators establish a safe and welcoming climate for addressing social issues and developing personal responsibility.  

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

4.3.2. Educators provide environments for developing many forms of leadership and leadership skills.

 

Practice: Participation in CTSOs

 

4.3.3. Educators promote opportunities for leadership in community settings to effect positive change. 

 

Practice: Participation in CTSOs

4.4. Cultural Competence. Students with gifts and talents value their own and others’ language, heritage, and circumstance. They possess skills in communicating, teaming, and collaborating with diverse individuals and across diverse groups. 1 They use positive strategies to address social issues, including discrimination and stereotyping.

4.4.1. Educators model appreciation for and sensitivity to students’ diverse backgrounds and languages.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

4.4.2. Educators censure discriminatory language and behavior and model appropriate strategies.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

4.4.3. Educators provide structured opportunities to collaborate with diverse peers on a common goal. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

4.5. Communication Competence. Students with gifts and talents develop competence in interpersonal and technical communication skills. They demonstrate advanced oral and written skills, balanced biliteracy or multiliteracy, and creative expression. They display fluency with technologies that support effective communication.

4.5.1. Educators provide opportunities for advanced development and maintenance of first and second language(s).

 

Practice: Curriculum Modifications and Accommodations

 

4.5.2. Educators provide resources to enhance oral, written, and artistic forms of communication, recognizing students’ cultural context.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

4.5.3. Educators ensure access to advanced communication tools, including assistive technologies, and use of these tools for expressing higher-level thinking and creative productivity. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

Standard 5: Programming 

Description: Educators are aware of empirical evidence regarding (a) the cognitive, creative, and affective development of learners with gifts and talents, and (b) programming that meets their concomitant needs. Educators use this expertise systematically and collaboratively to develop, implement, and effectively manage comprehensive services for students with a variety of gifts and talents to ensure specific student outcomes.

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

5.1. Variety of Programming. Students with gifts and talents participate in a variety of evidence-based programming options that enhance performance in cognitive and affective areas.

5.1.1. Educators regularly use multiple alternative approaches to accelerate learning.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

5.1.2. Educators regularly use enrichment options to extend and deepen learning opportunities within and outside of the school setting.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

5.1.3. Educators regularly use multiple forms of grouping, including clusters, resource rooms, special classes, or special schools. 

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

5.1.4. Educators regularly use individualized learning options such as mentorships, internships, online courses, and independent study.

 

Practice: Use of Option 2

 

5.1.5. Educators regularly use current technologies, including online learning options and assistive technologies to enhance access to high-level programming.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

 

5.1.6. Administrators demonstrate support for gifted programs through equitable allocation of resources and demonstrated willingness to ensure that learners with gifts and talents receive appropriate educational services.

 

Practice: Use of Option 2/Dual Credit Enrollment

5.2. Coordinated Services. Students with gifts and talents demonstrate progress as a result of the shared commitment and coordinated services of gifted education, general education, special education, and related professional services, such as school counselors, school psychologists, and social workers

5.2.1. Educators in gifted, general, and special education programs, as well as those in specialized areas, collaboratively plan, develop, and implement services for learners with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Lesson Planning

5.3. Collaboration. Students with gifts and talents’ learning is enhanced by regular collaboration among families, community, and the school. 

5.3.1. Educators regularly engage families and community members for planning, programming, evaluating, and advocating. 

 

Practice: District Website

5.4. Resources. Students with gifts and talents participate in gifted education programming that is adequately funded to meet student needs and program goals.

5.4.1. Administrators track expenditures at the school level to verify appropriate and sufficient funding for gifted programming and services. 

 

Practice: School Budget

5.5. Comprehensiveness. Students with gifts and talents develop their potential through comprehensive, aligned programming and services.

5.5.1. Educators develop thoughtful, multi-year program plans in relevant student talent areas, PK-12. 

 

Practice: Curriculum

5.6. Policies and Procedures. Students with gifts and talents participate in regular and gifted education programs that are guided by clear policies and procedures that provide for their advanced learning needs (e.g., early entrance, acceleration, credit in lieu of enrollment).

5.6.1. Educators create policies and procedures to guide and sustain all components of the program, including assessment, identification, acceleration practices, and grouping practices, that is built on an evidence-based foundation in gifted education. 

 

Practice: District Policies/G & T Procedures

5.7. Career Pathways. Students with gifts and talents identify future career goals and the talent development pathways to reach those goals. 

5.7.1. Educators provide professional guidance and counseling for individual student strengths, interests, and values.

 

Practice: Guidance and CST Services

 

5.7.2. Educators facilitate mentorships, internships, and vocational programming experiences that match student interests and aptitudes. 

 

Practice: Participation in Work Based Learning Experiences

Standard 6: Professional Development 

Description: All educators (administrators, teachers, counselors, and other instructional support staff) build their knowledge and skills using the NAGC-CEC Teacher Standards for Gifted and Talented Education and the National Staff Development Standards. They formally assess professional development needs related to the standards, develop and monitor plans, systematically engage in training to meet the identified needs, and demonstrate mastery of standard. They access resources to provide for release time, funding for continuing education, and substitute support. These practices are judged through the assessment of relevant student outcomes. 

Student Outcomes

Evidence-Based Practices

6.1. Talent Development. Students develop their talents and gifts as a result of interacting with educators who meet the national teacher preparation standards in gifted education.

6.1.1. Educators systematically participate in ongoing, research-supported professional development that addresses the foundations of gifted education, characteristics of students with gifts and talents, assessment, curriculum planning and instruction, learning environments, and programming.  

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

 

6.1.2. The school district provides professional development for teachers that models how to develop environments and instructional activities that encourage students to express diverse characteristics and behaviors that are associated with giftedness. 

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

 

6.1.3. Educators participate in ongoing professional development addressing key issues such as anti-intellectualism and trends in gifted education such as equity and access.

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

 

6.1.4. Administrators provide human and material resources needed for professional development in gifted education (e.g. release time, funding for continuing education, substitute support, webinars, or mentors).  

 

Practice: Schedule of Professional Development/Prep Time

 

6.1.5. Educators use their awareness of organizations and publications relevant to gifted education to promote learning for students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Lesson Plans

6.2. Socio-emotional Development. Students with gifts and talents develop socially and emotionally as a result of educators who have participated in professional development aligned with national standards in gifted education and National Staff Development Standards.

6.2.1. Educators participate in ongoing professional development to support the social and emotional needs of students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

6.3. Lifelong Learners. Students develop their gifts and talents as a result of educators who are life-long learners, participating in ongoing professional development and continuing education opportunities.

6.3.1. Educators assess their instructional practices and continue their education in school district staff development, professional organizations, and higher education settings based on these assessments.

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

 

6.3.2. Educators participate in professional development that is sustained over time, that includes regular follow-up, and that seeks evidence of impact on teacher practice and on student learning.

 

Practice:  PLCs/Professional Development Participation

6.3.3. Educators use multiple modes of professional development delivery including online courses, online and electronic communities, face-to-face workshops, professional learning communities, and book talks.

 

Practice: PLCs/Professional Development Participation

 

6.3.4. Educators identify and address areas for personal growth for teaching students with gifts and talents in their professional development plans. 

 

Practice: Staff PDPs

6.4. Ethics. Students develop their gifts and talents as a result of educators who are ethical in their practices. 

6.4.1. Educators respond to cultural and personal frames of reference when teaching students with gifts and talents.

 

Practice: Classroom Instruction/Lesson Plans

 

6.4.2. Educators comply with rules, policies, and standards of ethical practice.

 

Practice: Staff Sign Off on District policy Manual