Mercer County

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PowerSchool

Shared-time Program Descriptions

Career and technical education programs allow students to gain hands-on experience exploring a career that interests them.

 

ARCHITECTURAL/ENGINEERING DESIGN  Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers engaged in a wide variety of projects. It includes instruction in various pre-engineering support functions for research, production and operations as well as applications to specific engineering specialties. This program is affiliated with Project Lead the Way. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Analytical skills. Architects must understand the content of designs and the context in which they were created. For example, architects must understand the locations of mechanical systems and how those systems affect building operations.
  • Communication skills. Architects share their ideas, both in oral presentations and in writing, with clients, other architects, and workers who help prepare drawings. Many also give presentations to explain their ideas and designs.
  • Creativity. Architects design the overall look of houses, buildings, and other structures. Therefore, the final product should be attractive and functional.
  • Organizational skills. Architects often manage contracts. Therefore, they must keep records related to the details of a project, including total cost, materials used, and progress.
  • Technical skills. Architects need to use CADD technology to create plans as part of building information modeling (BIM).
  • Visualization skills. Architects must be able to see how the parts of a structure relate to each other. They also must be able to visualize how the overall building will look once completed.

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION TECHNOLOGY   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, reconstruct and finish automobile bodies, fenders and external features. Includes instruction in structure analysis, damage repair, non-structural analysis, mechanical and electrical components, plastics and adhesives, painting and refinishing techniques and damage analysis and estimating. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Critical-thinking skills. Automotive body and glass repairers must be able to evaluate vehicle damage and determine necessary repair strategies. In some cases, they must decide if a vehicle is “totaled,” or too damaged to justify the cost of repair.
  • Customer-service skills. Automotive body and glass repairers must discuss auto body and glass problems, along with options to fix them, with customers. Workers must be courteous, good listeners, and ready to answer customers’ questions.
  • Detail oriented. Automotive body and glass repairers must pay close attention to detail. Restoring a damaged auto body or windshield to its original state requires workers to have a keen eye for even the smallest imperfection. 
  • Dexterity. Many body repairers’ tasks, such as removing door panels, hammering out dents, and using hand tools to install parts, require a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination.
  • Mechanical skills. Body repairers must know which diagnostic, hydraulic, pneumatic, and other power equipment and tools are appropriate for certain procedures and repairs. They must know how to apply the correct techniques and methods necessary to repair modern automobiles.
  • Physical strength. Automotive body and glass repairers must sometimes lift heavy parts, such as door panels and windshields.
  • Time-management skills. Automotive body and glass repairers must be timely in their repairs. For many people, their automobile is their primary mode of transportation.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY   Arthur R. Sypek Center & Hopewell Valley Regional High School

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, service and maintain all types of automobiles. Includes instruction in brake systems, electrical systems, engine performance, engine repair, suspension and steering, automatic and manual transmissions and drive trains and heating and air conditioning systems. NOTE: Hopewell students attend during the afternoon session. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Customer-service skills. Service technicians must discuss automotive problems—along with options to fix them—with their customers. Because workers may depend on repeat clients for business, they must be courteous, good listeners, and ready to answer customers’ questions.
  • Detail oriented. Service technicians must be aware of small details when inspecting or repairing vehicle systems, because mechanical and electronic malfunctions are often due to misalignments or other easy-to-miss causes.
  • Dexterity. Service technicians perform many tasks that require steady hands and good hand-eye coordination, such as assembling or attaching components and subassemblies.
  • Mechanical skills. Service technicians must be familiar with engine components and systems and know how they interact with each other. They often must take apart major parts for repairs and be able to put them back together properly.
  • Organizational skills. Service technicians must keep workspaces clean and organized in order to maintain safety and ensure accountability of parts.
  • Physical strength. Service technicians must sometimes lift and maneuver heavy parts such as engines and body panels.
  • Troubleshooting skills. Service technicians must be able to use diagnostic equipment on engine systems and components in order to identify and fix problems in increasingly complicated mechanical and electronic systems. They must be familiar with electronic control systems and the appropriate tools needed to fix and maintain them.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills in the adjustment, maintenance, part replacement and repair of vehicles and mobile equipment. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Customer-service skills. Service technicians must discuss automotive problems—along with options to fix them—with their customers. Because workers may depend on repeat clients for business, they must be courteous, good listeners, and ready to answer customers’ questions.
  • Detail oriented. Service technicians must be aware of small details when inspecting or repairing vehicle systems, because mechanical and electronic malfunctions are often due to misalignments or other easy-to-miss causes.
  • Dexterity. Service technicians perform many tasks that require steady hands and good hand-eye coordination, such as assembling or attaching components and subassemblies.
  • Mechanical skills. Service technicians must be familiar with engine components and systems and know how they interact with each other. They often must take apart major parts for repairs and be able to put them back together properly.
  • Organizational skills. Service technicians must keep workspaces clean and organized in order to maintain safety and ensure accountability of parts.
  • Physical strength. Service technicians must sometimes lift and maneuver heavy parts such as engines and body panels.
  • Troubleshooting skills. Service technicians must be able to use diagnostic equipment on engine systems and components in order to identify and fix problems in increasingly complicated mechanical and electronic systems. They must be familiar with electronic control systems and the appropriate tools needed to fix and maintain them.

BAKING AND DINING SERVICES   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program focuses on the general study of baking and related culinary arts and prepares individuals for a variety of jobs within the food service industry including front-of-the-house operations.  It includes instruction in food preparation, cooking techniques, equipment operation and maintenance, sanitation and safety, communication skills, applicable regulations, and principles of food service management. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Detail oriented. Bakers must closely monitor their products in the oven to keep them from burning. They also should have an eye for detail because many pastries and cakes require intricate decorations.
  • Math skills. Bakers must possess basic math skills, especially knowledge of fractions, in order to precisely mix recipes, weigh ingredients, or adjust mixes.
  • Physical stamina. Bakers stand on their feet for extended periods while they prepare dough, monitor baking, or package baked goods.
  • Physical strength. Bakers should be able to lift and carry heavy bags of flour and other ingredients, which may weigh up to 50 pounds.

BUILDING MAINTENANCE TRADES  Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to keep a building functioning and to service a variety of structures including residential and industrial buildings.  The program includes instruction in the basic maintenance and repair skills required to service building systems, such as masonry, carpentry, plumbing, electrical and other mechanical systems. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Customer-service skills. These workers interact with customers on a regular basis. They need to be friendly and able to address customers’ questions.
  • Dexterity. Many repair and maintenance tasks, such as repairing small devices, connecting or attaching components, and using hand tools, require a steady hand and good hand–eye coordination.
  • Troubleshooting skills. Workers find, diagnose, and repair problems. They perform tests to figure out the cause of problems before fixing equipment.

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to provide basic administrative support under the supervision of office managers, administrative assistants, secretaries and other office personnel.  It includes instruction in typing, keyboarding, filing, general business correspondence, office equipment operation and communication skills. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Integrity. Many secretaries and administrative assistants are trusted to handle sensitive information. For example, medical secretaries collect patient data that is required, by law, to be kept confidential in order to protect patient privacy.
  • Interpersonal skills. Secretaries and administrative assistants interact with clients, customers, or staff. They should communicate effectively and be courteous when interacting with others to create a positive work environment and client experience.
  • Organizational skills. Secretaries and administrative assistants keep files, folders, and schedules in proper order so an office can run efficiently.
  • Writing skills. Secretaries and administrative assistants write memos and emails when communicating with managers, employees, and customers. Therefore, they must have good grammar, ensure accuracy, and maintain a professional tone.

CARPENTRY  Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to lay out, cut, fabricate, erect, install and repair wooden structures and fixtures using hand and power tools. The program includes instruction in technical mathematics, framing, construction materials and selection, job estimating, blueprint reading, foundations and roughing-in, finish carpentry techniques and applicable codes and standards.

Qualities for Success:

  • Business skills. Self-employed carpenters must be able to bid on new jobs, track inventory, and plan work assignments. 
  • Detail oriented. Carpenters perform many tasks that are important in the overall building process. Making precise measurements, for example, may reduce gaps between windows and frames, limiting any leaks around the window.
  • Dexterity. Carpenters use many tools and need hand-eye coordination to avoid injury or damaging materials. Striking the head of a nail, for example, is crucial to not damaging wood or injuring oneself.
  • Math skills. Carpenters use basic math skills every day to calculate volume and measure materials to be cut.
  • Physical stamina. Carpenters need physical endurance. They frequently stand, climb, or bend for long periods.
  • Physical strength. Carpenters use tools and materials that are heavy. For example, plywood sheets can weigh 50 to 100 pounds.
  • Problem-solving skills. Because construction jobs vary, carpenters must adjust project plans accordingly. For example, if a prefabricated window arrives at the worksite slightly oversized, carpenters must shave framework to make the window fit.

COSMETOLOGY   Arthur R. Sypek Center & Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals to cut, trim, and style scalp, facial, and body hair; apply cosmetic preparations; perform manicures and pedicures; massage the head and extremities; and prepare for practice as licensed cosmetologists in specialized or full-service salons. The program includes instruction in hair cutting and styling, manicuring, pedicuring, facial treatments, shampooing, chemical applications, esthetics, shop management, sanitation and safety, customer service, and applicable professional and labor laws and regulations. Preparation for the New Jersey licensing examination is provided. Licensing requirements include: high school diploma or equivalent, 1,000 consecutive hours of cosmetology instruction, successful completion of an accredited cosmetology program and a passing score on the required state licensing examination.  NOTE: All students are required to purchase their own kit for $450. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Creativity. Barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists must keep up with the latest trends and be ready to try new hairstyles for their clients.
  • Customer-service skills. Workers must be pleasant, friendly, and able to interact with customers in order to retain clients.
  • Listening skills. Barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists should be good listeners. They must listen carefully to what the client wants in order to make sure that the client is happy with the result.
  • Physical stamina. Barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists must be able to stand on their feet for long periods.
  • Tidiness. Workers must keep a neat personal appearance and keep their work area clean and sanitary. This requirement is necessary for the health and safety of their clients and for making clients comfortable enough so that they will want to return. 
  • Time-management skills. Time-management skills are important in scheduling appointments and providing services. For example, routine haircuts do not require the precise timing of some other services, such as applying neutralizer after a permanent wave. Clients who receive timely hair care are more likely to return.

CRIMINALISTICS & CRIMINAL SCIENCE   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program focuses on the application of clinical and criminal laboratory science, investigative techniques, and criminology to the reconstruction of crimes and the analysis of physical evidence. Includes instruction in laboratory science, laboratory procedures, criminology and police science, evidentiary testing and analysis, computer applications, record-keeping, reconstruction techniques, evidence handling and storage, and applications to specific types of evidence and crimes.  

Qualities for Success:

  • Communication skills. Police, detectives, and fish and game wardens must be able to speak with people when gathering facts about a crime and to express details about a given incident in writing.
  • Composure. Forensic science technicians must maintain their objectivity and professionalism, even while viewing the results of violence and destruction.
  • Critical-thinking skills. Forensic science technicians use their best judgment when matching physical evidence, such as fingerprints and DNA, to suspects.
  • Detail oriented. Forensic science technicians must be able to notice small changes in mundane objects to be good at collecting and analyzing evidence.
  • Empathy. Police officers need to understand the perspectives of a wide variety of people in their jurisdiction and have a willingness to help the public.
  • Good judgment. Police and detectives must be able to determine the best way to solve a wide array of problems quickly.
  • Leadership skills. Police officers must be comfortable with being a highly visible member of their community, as the public looks to them for assistance in emergency situations.
  • Math and science skills. Forensic science technicians need a solid understanding of statistics and natural sciences to be able to analyze evidence at a crime scene.
  • Perceptiveness. Officers, detectives, and fish and game wardens must be able to anticipate a person’s reactions and understand why people act a certain way.
  • Physical stamina. Officers and detectives must be in good physical shape, both to pass required tests for entry into the field, and to keep up with the daily rigors of the job.
  • Physical strength. Police officers must be strong enough to physically apprehend offenders.
  • Problem-solving skills. Forensic science technicians use scientific tests and methods to help law enforcement officials solve crimes.

CULINARY ARTS   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to provide professional chef and related cooking services in restaurants and other commercial food establishments. Includes instruction in recipe and menu planning, preparing and cooking of foods, supervising and training kitchen assistants, the management of food supplies and kitchen resources, aesthetics of food presentation, and familiarity or mastery of a wide variety of cuisines and culinary techniques. First-year students attend during the afternoon session.

Qualities for Success:

  • Business skills. Executive chefs and chefs who run their own restaurant need to understand the restaurant business. They should know how to budget for supplies, set prices, and manage workers so that the restaurant is profitable.
  • Communication skills. Chefs must communicate their instructions clearly and effectively to staff so that customers’ orders are prepared correctly.
  • Creativity. Chefs and head cooks need to be creative in order to develop and prepare interesting and innovative recipes. They should be able to use various ingredients to create appealing meals for their customers.
  • Dexterity. Chefs and head cooks need excellent manual dexterity, including proper knife techniques for cutting, chopping, and dicing.
  • Leadership skills. Chefs and head cooks must have the ability to motivate kitchen staff and develop constructive and cooperative working relationships with them.
  • Physical stamina. Chefs and head cooks often work long shifts and sometimes spend entire evenings on their feet, overseeing the preparation and serving of meals.
  • Sense of taste and smell. Chefs and head cooks must have a keen sense of taste and smell in order to inspect food quality and to design meals that their customers enjoy.
  • Time-management skills. Chefs and head cooks must efficiently manage their time and the time of their staff. They ensure that meals are prepared correctly and that customers are served on time, especially during busy hours.

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY   Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, service and maintain diesel engines in vehicles such as automobiles, buses, ships, trucks, railroad locomotives, and construction equipment; as well as stationary diesel engines in electrical generators and related equipment.  

Qualities for Success:

  • Detail oriented. Diesel technicians must be aware of small details when inspecting or repairing engines and components, because mechanical and electronic malfunctions are often due to misalignments and other easy-to-miss causes.
  • Dexterity. Mechanics need a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination for many tasks, such as disassembling engine parts, connecting or attaching components, or using hand tools.
  • Mechanical skills. Diesel technicians must be familiar with engine components and systems and know how they interact with each other. They often disassemble major parts for repairs, and they must be able to put them back together properly.
  • Organizational skills. Diesel technicians must keep workspaces clean and organized in order to maintain safety and ensure accountability for parts.
  • Strength. Diesel technicians often lift heavy parts and tools, such as exhaust system components and pneumatic wrenches.
  • Troubleshooting skills. Diesel technicians must be able to use diagnostic equipment on engine systems and components in order to identify and fix problems in increasingly complicated mechanical and electronic systems. They must be familiar with electronic control systems and the appropriate tools needed to fix and maintain them.

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION   Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals with technical knowledge and skills to install, operate, maintain and repair electrical apparatus and systems such as residential, commercial and industrial electric-power wiring; and DC and AC motors, controls and electric distribution panels. The program includes instruction in the principles of electronics and electrical systems, wiring, power transmission, safety, industrial and household appliances, job estimation, electrical testing and inspection, and applicable codes and standards. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Business skills. Self-employed electricians must be able to bid on new jobs, track inventory, and plan payroll and work assignments. 
  • Color vision. Electricians must identify electrical wires by color.
  • Critical-thinking skills. Electricians perform tests and use the results to diagnose problems. For example, when an outlet is not working, they may use a multimeter to check the voltage, amperage, or resistance to determine the best course of action.
  • Customer-service skills. Residential electricians work with people on a regular basis. They should be friendly and be able to address customers’ questions.
  • Physical stamina. Electricians often need to move around all day while running wire and connecting fixtures to the wire.
  • Physical strength. Electricians need to be strong enough to move heavy components, which may weigh up to 50 pounds.
  • Troubleshooting skills. Electricians find, diagnose, and repair problems. For example, if a motor stops working, they perform tests to determine the cause of its failure and then, depending on the results, fix or replace the motor.

GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY   Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to apply artistic and computer techniques to the interpretation of technical and commercial concepts. Includes instruction in computer-assisted art and design, printmaking, concepts sketching, technical drawing, color theory, imaging, studio technique, still and life modeling, multimedia applications, communication skills and commercial art business operations.

Qualities for Success:

  • Analytical skills. Graphic designers must be able to look at their work from the point of view of their consumers and examine how the designs they develop will be perceived by consumers to ensure they convey the client’s desired message.
  • Artistic ability. Graphic designers must be able to create designs that are artistically interesting and appealing to clients and consumers. They produce rough illustrations of design ideas, either by hand sketching or by using computer programs.
  • Communication skills. Graphic designers must communicate with clients, customers, and other designers to ensure that their designs accurately reflect the desired message and effectively express information.
  • Computer skills. Most graphic designers use specialized graphic design software to prepare their designs.
  • Creativity. Graphic designers must be able to think of new approaches to communicating ideas to consumers. They develop unique designs that convey a recognizable meaning on behalf of their clients.
  • Time-management skills. Graphic designers often work on multiple projects at the same time, each with a different deadline.

HEALTH AND CHILD CARE   Health Careers Center (NOTE: New location in Fall 2017.)

This program focuses on the application of public health specializations, public policy studies and the social and behavioral sciences to issues of health affecting women, children and families; and prepares individuals to function as maternal and child health specialists. Includes instruction in research design and testing, program evaluation, public policy analysis, public finance, economics of health care, community health, family development and dynamics, women's studies, social psychology, fetal and child development, biostatistics, health education and promotion, nutrition, neonatal development, psychology and social services delivery. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Critical-thinking skills. Must be able to assess changes in the health status of patients, including determining when to take corrective action and when to make referrals.
  • Communication skills. Must be able to communicate effectively with patients in order to understand their concerns and assess their health conditions. Nurses need to explain instructions, such as how to take medication, clearly. They must be able to work in teams with other health professionals and communicate the patients’ needs.
  • Compassion. Should be caring and empathetic when caring for patients.
  • Detail oriented. Must be responsible and detail oriented because they must make sure that patients get the correct treatments and medicines at the right time.
  • Emotional stability. Need emotional resilience and the ability to manage their emotions to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stresses.
  • Organizational skills. Often work with multiple patients with various health needs. Organizational skills are critical to ensure that each patient is given appropriate care.
  • Physical stamina. Should be comfortable performing physical tasks, such as moving patients. They may be on their feet for most of their shift.

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS   Health Careers Center (NOTE: New location in Fall 2017.)

This one-year program prepares individuals for entry into specialized training programs or for a variety of concentrations in the allied health area.  The program includes instruction in the basic sciences, research and clinical procedures and aspects of the subject matter related to various health occupations. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Critical-thinking skills. Registered nurses must be able to assess changes in the health status of patients, including determining when to take corrective action and when to make referrals.
  • Communication skills. Registered nurses must be able to communicate effectively with patients in order to understand their concerns and assess their health conditions. Nurses need to explain instructions, such as how to take medication, clearly. They must be able to work in teams with other health professionals and communicate the patients’ needs.
  • Compassion. Registered nurses should be caring and empathetic when caring for patients.
  • Detail oriented. Registered nurses must be responsible and detail oriented because they must make sure that patients get the correct treatments and medicines at the right time.
  • Emotional stability. Registered nurses need emotional resilience and the ability to manage their emotions to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stresses.
  • Organizational skills. Nurses often work with multiple patients with various health needs. Organizational skills are critical to ensure that each patient is given appropriate care.
  • Physical stamina. Nurses should be comfortable performing physical tasks, such as moving patients. They may be on their feet for most of their shift.

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY   Assunpink Center

This program prepares individuals to apply basic technical skills in support of engineers and other professionals engaged in developing and using air conditioning, refrigeration and heating systems. The program includes instruction in principles of heating and cooling technology, design and operational testing, inspection and maintenance procedures, installation and operation procedures and report preparation.

Qualities for Success:

  • Customer-service skills. HVACR technicians often work in customers’ homes or business offices, so it is important that they be friendly, polite, and punctual. Repair technicians sometimes must deal with unhappy customers whose heating or air conditioning is not working.
  • Detail oriented. HVACR technicians must carefully maintain records of all work performed. The records must include the nature of the work performed and the time it took, as well as list specific parts and equipment that were used.
  • Math skills. HVACR technicians need to calculate the correct load requirements to ensure that the HVACR equipment properly heats or cools the space required.
  • Mechanical skills. HVACR technicians install and work on complicated climate-control systems, so they must understand the HVAC components and be able to properly assemble, disassemble, and, if needed, program them.
  • Physical stamina. HVACR technicians may spend many hours walking and standing. The constant physical activity can be tiring.
  • Physical strength. HVACR technicians may have to lift and support heavy equipment and components, often without help.
  • Time-management skills. HVACR technicians frequently have a set number of daily maintenance calls. They should be able to keep a schedule and complete all necessary repairs or tasks.
  • Troubleshooting skills. HVACR technicians must be able to identify problems on malfunctioning heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems and then determine the best way to repair them.

Because HVACR workers often work in and around people’s homes, they may need to pass a background check before being hired.


HORTICULTURE AND TURF CARE MANAGEMENT  Arthur R. Sypek Center

This program prepares individuals to manage and maintain indoor and/or outdoor ornamental and recreational plants and groundcovers as well as related conceptual designs established by landscape architects, interior designers, enterprise owners or managers and individual clients. It includes instruction in applicable principles of horticulture, gardening, plant and soil irrigation and nutrition, turf maintenance, plant maintenance, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel supervision and purchasing. 

Qualities for Success:

  • Analytical skills. Landscape architects must understand the content of designs. When designing a building’s drainage system, for example, landscape architects must understand how the building’s location and surrounding land affect each other.
  • Communication skills. Landscape architects share their ideas, both orally and in writing, with clients, other architects, and workers who help prepare drawings. Effective communication is essential to ensuring that the vision for a project gets translated into reality.
  • Creativity. Landscape architects create the overall look of gardens, parks, and other outdoor areas. Their designs should be both pleasing to the eye and functional.
  • Physical stamina. Grounds maintenance workers must be capable of doing physically strenuous labor for long hours, occasionally in extreme heat or cold.
  • Problem-solving skills. When designing outdoor spaces, landscape architects must be able to provide solutions to unanticipated challenges. These solutions often involve looking at challenges from different perspectives and providing the best recommendations.
  • Self-motivated. Because they often work with little supervision, grounds maintenance workers must be able to do their job independently.
  • Technical skills. Landscape architects use computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) programs to create representations of their projects. Some also must use geographic information systems (GIS) for their designs.
  • Visualization skills. Landscape architects must be able to imagine how an overall outdoor space will look once completed.

 

(*) Skills listed under "Qualities for Success" are based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook data. 

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HIB Contacts

To report an incident of Harrassment, Intimidation and Bullying (HIB), please contact a specialist below.

District Anti-Bullying Coordinator

Anne Benoit

ABenoit@mcts.edu or 609-586-5144, Ext. 2146

 

Back-Up Coordinator

David Lugo

DLugo@mcts.edu or 609-737-9785, Ext. 4012

 

District Specialist

Dana HiceDePugh

DHicedepugh@mcts.edu or 609-570-3400

 

Adult Evening School Specialist

Mary Smith-Jones

MSmith-Jones@mcts.edu or 609-586-5146

 

Assunpink Center Specialist

Megan Ferdetta

MFerdetta@mcts.edu or 609-586-5144, Ext. 2140

 

Health Careers Center Specialist

Sharon Nemeth

SNemeth@mcts.edu or 609-586-5144

Kelly Pike

KPike@mcts.edu or 609-587-7640

 

STEM Academy/Career Prep Specialist

Marcie Tandy

MTandy@mcts.edu or 609-570-3406

 

Sypek Center Specialist

Lance Simek

LSimek@mcts.edu or 609-737-9785, Ext. 4140

Accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commissions on Elementary and Secondary Schools